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Dementia and refusing to eat, what to do.

Sadly, dementia patients often refuse to eat and/or lack appetite, which can be a source of worry and frustration for caregivers. The risk of your loved one choking or inhaling food into their lungs is too high to force them to eat. A loved one with dementia who refuses to eat requires creative, compassionate solutions.

There is a range of factors that may cause dementia sufferers to lose their appetite, including confusion, mood, and inability to recognise hunger signals. The body shuts down due to the progression of dementia in severe-stage sufferers who lose appetite/interest in food. Here are some tips for coping with dementia-related refusal to eat:

Advice on Eating and Dementia

  • Examine whether their vision is a contributing factor. If they’re not finishing their meal, try turning their plate 180 degrees and then see if they finish.
  • Find contrasts and colours. White plates on white tablecloths may distract your loved one, while colourful dishes can aid their focus.
  • Besides water, find alternative hydration methods. Try soup or cereal as a liquid meal.
  • Your loved one’s eating habits might be caused by dental issues. If necessary, take them to the dentist if there is redness, swelling, or pain.
  • Consider heartburn, constipation, diarrhoea, and nausea as possible causes of your loved one’s refusal to eat. Inquire about any medications the patient is taking that might be causing the loss of appetite.
  • Snacks and meals should be small, frequent, and easy to eat.
  • Walking can stimulate appetites, so encourage your loved one to get some light exercise. Find ideas for exercises to help those with dementia.
  • Provide your loved one with a drink or moistened sponge so that they can stay comfortable. A drop of honey or maple syrup or small amounts of juice may also be pleasant.
  • Speak to your loved one’s doctor about the possibility of prolonging life through artificial nutrition and hydration.
  • Join caregiver support groups. They offer valuable advice from people who have been in similar situations.

Be Patient

Remember, your loved one is an adult, not a child. If your loved one refuses to eat, do not punish them; simply try another tactic and start over. It may be possible to come up with a solution that will satisfy their hunger and reduce your worries at the same time. 

For further information about the help we can give you call our experienced team at HomeCare Mellor on 01772 722 985 or 01254 689 981

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Taking Care of Someone With Parkinson’s

Are you or a loved one suffering from Parkinson’s?  There is no need to feel alone. It is a neurological movement disorder characterised by impaired brain function. Over 10 million people around the world suffer from Parkinson’s disease.

As a progressive condition, Parkinson’s disease has no cure. Fortunately, treatment is often effective, often for a long time. As Parkinson’s disease progresses, patients may need more assistance from their caregivers.

There are ways to help a loved one with Parkinson’s. Know what to do, what to avoid, and how to stay healthy.

Know the Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease

Hand Tremors

Families and friends are often the first to notice Parkinson’s symptoms. In early stages, these changes are easily confused with signs of aging.

Parkinson’s symptoms include:

  • Tremors or shaking in the hand or jaw
  • Jerky, rigid movements
  • Bradykinesia (slow movements)
  • Muscle cramps and contractions
  • Difficulty moving and maintaining balance
  • Reduced facial expressiveness
  • Stooped posture
  • Difficulty chewing and swallowing
  • Soft, hoarse, or monotonous speech
  • Dizziness upon standing
  • Cramped handwriting
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Constipation
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Loss of smell
  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Dementia and other cognitive issues
  • Hallucinations and delusions

Parkinson’s Disease: How You Can Help

The following are some ways in which you can assist someone who suffers from Parkinson’s disease.

Medical Care

Parkinson’s disease can be treated with medication and surgery. It can be helpful for a loved one to:

  • Accompany the person to doctor’s visits.
  • Make sure the person is taking their medication regularly.
  • Report any worsening symptoms or changes in behaviour to the person’s healthcare provider so they can adjust their medication and treatment plan accordingly.

As the person ages, they may develop dementia, making participation in their medical care more difficult. Medications may need to be decided by a trusted family member or caregiver.

Practical Care

Keep the floor free from tripping or slipping hazards.

The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can make it difficult for people to walk and maintain their balance. To prevent someone with Parkinson’s disease from falling and injuring themselves, take these steps:

  • Keep the floor clear of throw rugs, footstools, and other tripping hazards. Keep cables and wires away from the floor. Clean up spills immediately. 
  • Install grab bars in the bathing area and anti-skid mats in the bathroom.
  • Brighten entryways, hallways, and staircases in the house. Night lights make it easier for the person to get to the bathroom at night.
  • Securing the stairs: Check that none of the treads are loose. For support, install a railing on both sides. Shift their living quarters to the ground floor if they have difficulty using the stairs. Install ramps for stairs you can’t avoid.
  • Make your living situation safer by consulting an occupational therapist.

Everyday activities can be harder with Parkinson’s disease. Here are some tips:

  • Due to symptoms such as hand tremors, muscle cramps, and bradykinesia, your loved one may take longer to complete simple tasks such as getting dressed. Give them enough time to finish their daily tasks by planning ahead. Before starting, wait until the medication kicks in if they’re taking medication.
  • You may want to simplify buttoning, zippering, and lacing for your loved one. Toolkits with button aids, zipper pulls, sock aids, long-handled shoehorns, and dressing sticks can be helpful. To make dressing easier, replace their clothes and shoes with versions with Velcro or elasticated closures.
  • People with Parkinson’s disease may require assistance with bathing, dressing, and other personal hygiene tasks as their motor functions decline.

Emotional Care

To cope with the changes brought by the diagnosis, your loved one will need a lot of emotional support. Denial, shock, disbelief, fear, sorrow, anger, and frustration are common emotions they feel.

You can provide your loved one with emotional support by using the following tips:

  • You can help your loved one cope with Parkinson’s disease by learning about the condition.
  • Support them in seeking therapy or joining a support group to help them cope with their emotions.
  • Spend time with friends and family to have their company and support: Planning activities where the person can spend time with friends and family can be helpful.
  • Despite all that you may have to do to care for a terminally ill person, remain affectionate and maintain your bond with them. Make the time spent together enjoyable for both of you by adding fun elements like songs and jokes to your daily routine.

Managing Parkinson’s Disease as a Caregiver

These are some things to avoid while caring for someone with Parkinson’s disease:

  • Stay with a daily schedule: Follow the same routine throughout the day so the person knows what to expect. Changing routines may be challenging.
  • Make sure there are no distracting stimuli in the person’s environment, like loud noises or bright-patterned decor, since that can be confusing.
  • Changes to their environment should be avoided, such as changing the layout of the house. Fall prevention can be achieved by keeping it the same.
  • Communication with them should be simple: only ask ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions. Don’t interrupt them or finish their sentences. If you interrupt them between sentences, they may become confused.
  • You should be patient with them: Parkinson’s disease can impede speech and movement. Make them feel comfortable by matching their pace.
  • Be careful not to shout at them: It’s easy to get frustrated or angry with your loved one. Be careful not to shout at them. Parkinson’s disease may be accompanied by dementia, which can lead to aggressive behavior. Talk to them calmly and be still.

Talking with loved ones about Parkinson’s

Make sure to check in on your loved ones.

Here are some tips for talking to a loved one about Parkinson’s:

  • Make sure you check in regularly to see how the person is doing.
  • Be empathetic: Parkinson’s disease can hinder a person’s daily activities. Previously easy tasks might be challenging. They may find this difficult and frustrating. Empathize with them so they feel supported.
  • As Parkinson’s disease progresses, the individual may not be able to drive, cook, clean, or care for themselves. Make sure they know they can count on you for assistance.
  • If your loved one has the ability to make important decisions, you can encourage them to do so.

As a caregiver, here are a few tips to keep in mind

It’s important to take care of yourself while caring for someone with Parkinson’s disease. Here are some tips:

  • Be patient with yourself: You may not be the only one struggling with your loved one’s diagnosis. Your entire world might feel as though it has turned upside down. Allow yourself to process your emotions so that you can stabilize yourself and support others.
  • Caregiving is stressful and requires a lot of effort. Establishing realistic goals and determining your limits can be helpful. 
  • Allow yourself to make mistakes: People sometimes fail to do everything they planned or as they hoped. You are human, so everything isn’t always perfect. 
  • Find medical services, support groups, and other community resources in advance to help your loved one or yourself.

Your helping hand, HomeCare Mellor

When a loved one is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, you probably have a lot of questions about how the disease progresses and what you can do to help. 

Understanding the condition can help you prepare for the journey ahead. Take care of yourself throughout the process and get help when you need it. 

Speak to us today on;

01772 722 985 or 01254 689 981

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Return to independent living after a hospital stay

In the event that you have been in hospital, suffered illness or had a fall, our reablement care can help you regain your strength and confidence.


It can be a frightening experience to recover at home on your own. But if you need a bit of extra help to get back on your feet, our compassionate and friendly staff can help you.
It is our pleasure to offer tailored care packages to people, based on their needs, circumstances, and preferences. The Reablement program provides HomeCare through a visiting care worker.


How does reablement care work?


You will receive personal care, assistance with daily living activities, and other practical tasks for a limited period of time from our reablement care staff. It is our goal for you to gain both the confidence and practical skills to do these activities independently.

Reablement care is an effective solution for those who need short-term intensive support.

Particularly helpful for those who have been in hospital – your consultant will only discharge you if they agree that you can handle things on your own, or that you have the right level of support at home.

As a result, you are comfortable, capable and confident in living independently, since it is personalised to your needs and circumstances.

Who can benefit from this?

● Inpatients in the NHS or private hospitals who can safely go home if they have a hospital discharge care plan
● Domiciliary care and or sleeping/waking night care for people who require high levels of support
● Confusion following illness/infection, which may make people feel unsafe in the absence of others
● Those who are frail and need intensive care before they can live independently

At HomeCare Mellor, we are known for providing rapid, responsive, and person-centred reablement care services to the public sector.

What Happens?

1. The first meeting

Contacting us is the first step in the process. An experienced member of our consultation team will talk through your challenges and difficulties with you, making notes on how we may be able to help.

2. Selecting the right service

Once we have gathered your first set of information, we refer you to our wider team of specialists to select which care services are right for you.

3. Providing ongoing support

Due to the fact that situations can change quickly, our continuous support after our services is enrolled is a key part of our offering.

By doing so, we can make any necessary adjustments as soon as possible, allowing you to concentrate on getting better.

We are committed to providing practical and affordable solutions which enable people to return to or remain in their own homes. Our aim is to complete care assessments within 24 hours of contact. We are particularly responsive in emergency situations and can swiftly provide a package of care from the initial contact.

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How to Feed Someone With Swallowing Difficulties

As children, we are taught that chicken soup will make us well, but when someone has trouble swallowing, eating or drinking can become dangerous. It is known medically as dysphagia when a person has difficulty swallowing. Aspiration pneumonia can be caused not just by choking, but by liquids or food particles sliding down the windpipe and infecting the lungs.

When a loved one has difficulty swallowing, avoiding these dangers can prove challenging, but there are some ways to make it easier and more enjoyable.

Creating the right environment is essential. 

When it comes to eating, prepare ahead of time for someone who has difficulty swallowing. Disconnect from television and focus on food. Encourage your loved one to sit upright while eating. Give them enough time to chew and swallow. Pay attention to your loved ones as they eat. When it’s time for them to bite or sip, make eye contact and open and close your mouth. You should be especially aware if your loved one appears to be choking or retaining food in their mouth.

Learn what foods they like.

Before becoming ill, your loved one enjoyed a wide variety of foods. With fewer options, it may be useful to explore new ways to enjoy the flavours that your loved one enjoys as well as to try new flavours. Consider foods with thicker sauces. This will make swallowing easier.

When swallowing is difficult, the following foods can be eaten:

  • Custards, puddings, and yoghurt
  • Fruits that have been purified
  • Bread that is puréed
  • Meats that have been purified
  • Purified vegetables
  • Pureed soup

Butter, milk, cream, sour cream, honey, and jelly can be added to these foods to add calories. Protein can be added to recipes by substituting milk for water and by making smoothies with yoghurt or peanut butter. Dry foods, particularly those containing crumbs, such as non-pureed bread, pastries, and non-pureed meats or beans, should be avoided. Be particularly careful with foods that have a mixture of textures.

Add thickening agents. 

Many favourite foods can be pureed or chopped into small pieces for people with difficulty swallowing, but liquids are a different matter. Thicker liquids pass down the throat more slowly, preventing aspiration. Thicken soups naturally with powdered mashed potatoes or gelatin.

It is good to keep a food journal to keep track of foods and recipes that work for you. Keeping track of what your loved one ate at each meal can also be helpful. A couple of small meals throughout the day is usually easier than just one or two big meals.

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Keeping someone with dementia safe from Coronavirus

Coronavirus restrictions continue to be lifted now that most adults in the UK have received vaccinations and pressure on the NHS has decreased. However, keeping safe and minimizing risk will always be important for people with dementia.

COVID-19: How to stay safe

Coronavirus vaccination offers the best protection against COVID-19. In addition to strong protection for you, the vaccine helps prevent the spread of Coronavirus to others. In the case of newer variants of the virus, a single dose will only provide limited protection, so it is very important to have both doses.

It’s still imperative that you keep yourself and others safe, even after getting both vaccines against Coronavirus. There will likely be a large increase in the amount of virus spread throughout the community as people begin mixing more over the coming weeks and months.

People in the UK are being advised to remain cautious and act responsibly. England has, however, removed all legal restrictions. Face covering is no longer a legal requirement everywhere. Yet there may still be a requirement to enter some places, such as on public transport in London, Scotland, and Wales. You can still wear a mask if you wish to, despite the lifting of legal restrictions.

Even after social distancing measures are loosened, Coronavirus is still in circulation, including easily transmissible strains. In crowds and when meeting other people, it is still important to be cautious to reduce the risk of getting or spreading Coronavirus. 

Coronavirus guidance with dementia

Dementia makes this more difficult. A person may not understand what guidance means, or they may forget how to remain safe.

Describe the guidance clearly in a calm manner to the person. Consider our suggestions for effective communication. Perhaps mentioning that the advice is from the NHS, GP, or someone the person trusts can help. By following the guidelines, Coronavirus rates are likely to remain low thus fewer people become seriously ill.

During the time you are with the person, you may need to reiterate this information to remind them why they should follow the guidelines. 

Assisting the person in feeling confident about getting out

Everyone can now go out more as there are no restrictions on exercising or leaving the house. Many people with dementia enjoy walking, and physical exercise is good for all of us.

During the pandemic, many individuals living with dementia lost skills or independence. Staying active helps those living with dementia maintain their independence. By doing so, they can regain the skills and motivation that they may have lost during the lockdown. 

You might find it helpful to:

  • Rather than focusing on what they can’t do, encourage the person to rebuild their confidence by focusing on what they can do
  • To ease the person back into their former favourite activities, support them in returning to them. This might require adjusting the way they do things, or reducing the time they spend doing them
  • Help them to go at a pace that is most comfortable for them.

While out and about, however, it is important to follow the safety guidelines and minimise the risk of injury. 

You might also find the following suggestions helpful:

  • By placing a simple poster near the front door, they’ll be reminded to carry a face shield when necessary (unless exempt) and to be careful in crowded places
  • Consider using assistive technology, such as a device that plays an automated reminder that you can customise, telling you the pandemic is still ongoing and that you need to use caution when outdoors 
  • Walking in quieter areas and at quieter times.

Maintaining an active lifestyle 

In addition, you and the person you care for should stay: 

  • Taking part in physical activity – whether indoors or outdoors 
  • Engaging mentally – by trying a new activity (online or off), or learning a new skill 
  • Stay in touch with your friends and family to stay socially active. 

Engage the person in choosing what you do at home and in the community. Activities should be enjoyable, meaningful, and tailored to a person’s interests and preferences. Feelings of stress, anxiety, and low mood can also be eased by physical exercise and having a sense of purpose.

Maintaining good hygiene 

To prevent Coronavirus from spreading, it is still important to keep hands clean and follow good respiratory hygiene. Examples include: 

  • It is recommended that you wash your hands often with soap and water (or, if this is not possible, you must use a hand sanitiser) 
  • If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow rather than your hands.  
  • Dispose of used tissues as soon as possible  
  • Keep your hands away from your face.  

The importance of handwashing cannot be overstated. When you come home from being outside or shopping, after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, and before you eat or handle food, wash your hands. As soon as you arrive at work and as soon as you leave, wash your hands.  

Alzheimer’s patients may not be able to remember how to take care of themselves if they have memory problems or are confused.

Encourage them to stay safe by following these tips:

  • You can hang reminder signs or posters near hand basins.
  • Set reminders such as: “Time to wash your hands.” using digital devices.
  • Encourage the person by washing your hands together.
  • You can simplify the task if this makes it easier for them to follow.
  • Talk to the person while handwashing to find out how this makes them feel
  • Observing what’s going on around the person can help with anxiety.
  • Instead of criticising errors, offer encouragement and praise.    

If a person is not familiar with liquid soap, it may be helpful to use a traditional soap bar in a colour different from the sink.

Hand moisturisers and barrier creams will help keep skin healthy if you wash or use hand sanitiser more frequently.

Fresh air 

It is much easier to spread Coronavirus inside than outside. When someone in the household has a Coronavirus or someone is visiting, it’s especially important to ensure that the indoor spaces have a supply of fresh air. 

The easiest way to get fresh air is to open the windows, as long as it is safe for you to do so without cooling the room too much. Make sure any vents or grilles on the top of your windows are open. 

The availability of medicines

Each member of the household must have the necessary medication to remain healthy.

Repeat prescriptions should be available to you, or the person you care for, through your GP surgery or a pharmacy as they were before the restrictions.

You can order repeat prescriptions online if you can – or have someone who you trust do it for you – if you do not feel comfortable going out for now. For help or if you cannot order online, contact your GP surgery or local pharmacy. They may offer a delivery service to assist you.

If you don’t live with the person 

Ensure the person with dementia knows how much help is available if you live apart from them. You should know who to contact if they don’t have a plan. Put important contact information near the phone. You can also:

  • Find local community support groups. 
  • Stay in touch with them if you or they are isolating themselves or minimizing social contact. Social media platforms such as Skype, WhatsApp, and Zoom allow people to stay in touch via video calls. This approach isn’t for everyone. Instead of using these tools, you could call, text, write letters, or post family photos. Establishing regular times and days for calls can give a person structure and something to anticipate. Connecting with the person will make them feel loved and may keep you in their thoughts. Their feelings of sadness and loneliness will be reduced if they feel connected to you.
  • Discuss scams with the individual. They need to be informed about the scams involving Coronavirus so that they know what to look out for.
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CareGiver Opportunities

There are a variety of caregiver jobs, and you can work in a variety of settings as a caregiver.

You can find CareGiver jobs in all sectors of health and social care, and it doesn’t require any formal education or training. 

Adult Social Care Jobs in Preston, Blackburn & Chorley – https://www.homecaremellor.co.uk/interview

In this role, you could be required to work nights and weekends as well as day shifts, and there is a great deal of opportunity to work part-time. There are many jobs for CareGivers in the UK. However, you can most likely find a job that meets your requirements close to home.

A CareGiver has a wide range of skills and knowledge, including a strong understanding of vulnerable people. The ability to understand and adhere to your role as a professional is a must, as well as understanding how the legislation applies to your protection as well as that of your client. There’s a need for a sense of humour and the ability to handle challenging behaviour. You usually get to know the individual(s) you are working with very well because it’s a very intense job. 

CareGiver’s In Mental Health

A mental health CareGiver can work in a variety of settings. There may also be instances when you work with individuals who suffer from depression or dementia.

Among your responsibilities are promoting independent living, providing regular and practical support, and assisting the service user with gaining access to resources they would otherwise not be aware of.

An example would be a community mental health team, an early intervention service, or a care centre.

You should demonstrate a genuine caring nature, and assist the individual in overcoming their problems. You should also be able to prioritise your workload.

Individuals are typically cared for by a multidisciplinary team, so your ability to communicate effectively with other team members is important.

Part-time Hours Available In Blackburn, Preston & Chorley https://www.homecaremellor.co.uk/interview

CareGiver In The Community

You usually get to know the individual(s) you are working with very well, making it a lifestyle rather than a job.

Community CareGiver’s visit people in their own homes who need assistance. It could be a person who has been discharged from a hospital or someone who has lost their mobility, or it could just be someone who needs some assistance to maintain their independence.

Most CareGivers are expected to assist with personal care, bathing, dressing, cooking, and occasionally cleaning if needed. Mobility and treatment will play a large role in the scope of needs of an individual. In some cases, you may work with a nurse as part of their manual handling guidelines when moving people, or you may be working on your own to ensure that a service user has a healthy meal on that particular day.

A CareGiver may work alongside a social worker or a case manager, so being able to actively participate as an individual and as a team member is an essential part of the job.

Being a CareGiver is a hugely rewarding career. It can offer a real sense of achievement and reward in the knowledge that you are helping to make someone’s life better.

The work can be stressful at times, and you could be working alone on occasion. A strong character is necessary to recognise stress and ask for help when you need it. A potential employer will never ask you to work outside of your capabilities, and you should always point out your skills level to them when asked to do something you aren’t trained to do. Many employers offer training in basic first aid, manual handling, and maybe even medication handling, but don’t try to do something you haven’t been trained to do. 

In addition to providing care for local councils and private clients, HomeCare Mellor is always expanding its team of hardworking professionals.

Our company is looking for people with strong work ethics and a passion for caring for the community.

Transparency is very important to us as an employer.

  • No hidden deductions from pay. Guaranteed
  • We cover your travel allowance, so there are no additional taxes in your pay
  • Get paid to train and enhance your skills at our training suite
  • To save time and travel, you will work closely in one area 
  • Your role is supported by an excellent management team
  • You can progress in a real career with us
  • You receive holiday pay
  • Work hours are flexible with us

Are you ready to get started? Set up an interview and join our team.

It’s super easy – head to https://www.homecaremellor.co.uk/interview and select a day and time best for you.

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Interview questions for care workers

If you love a job that is different every day, then caring could be your perfect career. 

Despite its challenges, caring can be hugely rewarding, allowing you to have a positive impact on the lives of society’s most vulnerable individuals.

As qualifications are not required to enter care work, it is appealing to both young adults and career changers. Nevertheless, you must be prepared to advance your skills and knowledge via training and development.

However, you must first pass the job interview. There isn’t always a one-size-fits-all solution for every job, but based on your previous work or life experience, you may have gained many essential qualities.

Next, we’ll learn how to highlight these qualities for an interviewer’s benefit.

Preparation is key to maximising your interview potential.

Preparation

Despite the high demand for care workers, it is still essential you prepare well to ensure a successful application to an organisation that mirrors your values and ethics.

It’s important to remember that interviewers aren’t expecting you to have perfect work experience, even if your CV lacks relevant examples. Besides how you respond, they’ll assess your character, engagement, and communication skills.

This list provides sample questions, but it is not intended to cover every possible scenario. For that reason, it makes sense to prepare sample questions in advance.

Make sure you understand the responsibilities of the role by reading the job description thoroughly.

Be prepared to respond to any topical questions that may arise by keeping current with the latest industry news. In case of any policy-related discussions, having a thorough understanding of care guidelines and legislation is helpful.

Prepare bullet points instead of stating your responses word-for-word. The pressure of an interview will allow you to speak naturally and keep your core points in mind. Have a friend or loved one conduct a mock interview to uncover areas that need further attention.

Here are some examples of care worker interview questions

Questions in a care interview can be classified into technical, experiential, and personality-based questions. Examples include:

Are you familiar with the responsibilities of a care worker?

You need to demonstrate to the interviewer that you’ve done your homework by accurately assessing the job description. You can get a better understanding of your expected duties by reading accounts of care workers’ daily routines. Alternatively, you can read reviews and descriptions from the company’s current employees on job sites and social media.

Could you describe your qualities for the job?

Consider your reasons for entering the field of care. The key strengths you bring to the position will likely be informed by your motivation. How effective are you at listening? Are you good at making people laugh or at putting them at ease? The softer skills you acquire to provide the foundation for your care work, allowing you to establish productive relationships with coworkers and clients alike. Additional relevant experience would be advantageous.

Do you have any examples of previous teamwork?

It’s crucial to rely on your colleagues during pressure situations in care work. No matter how much knowledge you have, your clients will suffer if you are unable to work together effectively. One of the organisation’s primary objectives is creating a harmonious team environment, creating happy employees and increasing staff retention.

How have you handled stressful situations? 

This might be related to previous work or life experience. Although these events can be uncomfortable, they offer an opportunity for growth, which is usually what interviewers are looking for. As a result, you are better able to empathize with your clients who may be suffering from their own health-related stress.

Do you have any past experience caring for someone, whether for a family member or voluntarily?

Although formal experience isn’t always necessary, some job seekers gain industry exposure through volunteering, which can benefit them greatly at interviews. Despite not volunteering, you may have demonstrated care-centric skills when dealing with friends or loved ones and can utilise this knowledge. Having compassion will allow you to succeed in the role.

Are you familiar with safeguarding?

Keeping a client safe from harm, abuse and neglect is the safeguarding of their health, wellbeing and human rights. A robust framework is necessary for protecting vulnerable individuals receiving care. Your expected duty of care is outlined in the Care Act of 2014 and should be reviewed before the interview.

Do you know what person-centred care is?

The evidence is emerging that people-centred interventions may be more effective than prescriptive care. For improved health outcomes, you need to involve your clients in their care and allow them to decide what is best for them. It is not your job to do everything for your clients. Instead, it’s about finding ways to engage clients in the process and assisting them where necessary.

What would you do if you were dealing with an upset or confused client?

It can be difficult for clients when they begin to need help with their activities of daily living. Many people find it difficult to accept a stranger into their lives to assist with personal tasks. In order to ensure a safe, effective work environment, it is important to adopt a calm, patient demeanour. It might be helpful to discuss the client with your coworkers or superiors in order to determine the best course of action. By consulting family and friends, alternative methods of intervention and support can be discovered.

How have you handled a crisis or an event requiring quick thinking?

If you’ve never done a Heimlich manoeuvre in a restaurant before, it’s possible that you have averted potential risks or dealt with emergency situations in the past. When helping clients with potentially unstable health conditions, drawing on these incidents provides evidence of your ability to use your initiative.

A client who is elderly would require what kind of assistance?

The majority of care workers will work with elderly clients. Due to their age, illness, or disability, these individuals may require greater support. As well as helping with household, community, and functional activities, these individuals may require assistance with aspects such as personal care.

In what way would you take care of a person with Dementia?

This technical question may vary based on the job application and the clients you may be working with. In order to answer any care questions effectively, you must have at least a basic understanding of the common health conditions among the group of clients you are proposing, as well as any specific tools or techniques care workers use in their day-to-day work.

How would you maintain the dignity and respect of a client?

Prior to illness or disability, clients may have been strong and independent and now need help with what they consider basic tasks, resulting in feelings of vulnerability. Keeping clients’ dignity and respect is therefore essential. Personal care is one example. Consent is important before helping clients while providing as much privacy as possible. Helping a client stay independent as much as possible means encouraging them to do what they can while you facilitate.

Tell me about your previous employment

During an interview, you may be asked if you have any transferable skills from your previous role(s), as well as why you are leaving your current employer. It may be especially important for those who are changing careers or entering care for the first time. Your previous experience as a care worker may qualify you for the new role if you’re transitioning.

What hours are you available to work?

Providing care to clients doesn’t stop at 5 pm; they require support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. People with family responsibilities may find the varying shift patterns and flexibility of caring appealing. In light of this, it is a good idea to plan ahead when you can work.

Have you any final questions?

You may be asked if you want more details about the company after the interview. It’s your chance to thoroughly vet your employer to be sure there’s a good fit culturally. Your research may have raised more specific questions regarding the management structure, career opportunities, induction process, and support you can expect.

The following sample questions should prompt you to reflect on your past experiences and how you can select relevant examples to demonstrate your skills and knowledge. However, enthusiasm is more important than anything else. If you shine through your enthusiasm for care work, you may not be too far from finding your dream job.

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Activites for Carers and People Living with Dementia

To maintain overall well-being, it is essential for a person living with dementia to engage in meaningful activities. As part of caring for someone with dementia, such as in their own home, various activities can be undertaken together.

Dementia-friendly activities can be great for boosting moods and bringing joy, but it is important to take into consideration the abilities, likes and dislikes of the person with dementia in order to provide engaging and enjoyable activities.

This article presents some fantastic dementia activities that anyone with dementia and their caregiver can enjoy together.  

Recollections

During the course of dementia, it becomes more challenging for someone to recall memories, and sometimes prompts are necessary. A great activity for sparking conversations and bringing back fond memories is to reminisce together.

An exciting reminiscence activity is to listen together to the music that the person with dementia is familiar with, such as a wedding song or a song from their era. Ask gentle questions like ‘did you enjoy dancing to this song?’ and ‘did they play this at parties?’ so the person with dementia can share their stories about the song.

Another great way to spark memories is to look through old photographs together and talk about the places and people featured. Alternatively, if it isn’t possible for the person to provide their own photos, carefully selected pictures from postcards or magazines that have meant something to them can be used.

Photos of places or things can evoke memories; why not use pictures of places like holiday destinations or sports games?

Arts and Crafts

It is well known that creative activities are fantastic for boosting mood and promoting relaxation while also providing a sense of accomplishment. 

A person’s abilities and preferences should be taken into account when planning the activities.

Painting from a still life object, colouring in an age-appropriate picture, making decorations, or knitting together are all possible activities. Providing encouragement as a caregiver can be just as important as ensuring they complete the activity. Seeing the creation displayed can also help to reinforce the sense of achievement.

Exercise

Staying active can promote mental health and physical well-being as we age. The range of activities and exercises available to older adults may change depending on their mobility, balance, cognitive or vision challenges, but they can still remain active.

Daily activity can be provided by doing some seated exercises together or taking a walk around the garden.

Sensory Box

With age, our senses can sometimes decline, causing us to withdraw from activities or conversations. You can offer a multitude of benefits and enhance the quality of life by exploring meaningful sensory activities together. People living with dementia can benefit greatly from engaging in sensory activities, especially if their communication is limited or they are not able to go outdoors as often. 

The sense of smell or music can transport someone to a fond memory and reduce agitation with sensory activities.

It can be fun and engaging to create a sensory box together, which can be revisited over and over again. Place items that will both engage the senses and hold significance for the person in the box. It can be a CD with a favourite song, a photograph of a loved one, a familiar fragrance or garment.

You can ask gentle questions to spark conversation as you place each item into (or take it out of) the box.

For a carer and a person living with dementia, there are many activities available. Whenever choosing an activity, it is important to consider the person’s routine, preferences, and hobbies, as those that are meaningful or fond will be most enjoyable.

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Face coverings – How caregivers can overcome the barrier to communication.

The use of face coverings is likely going to be in use for quite a while and this can present an additional communication barrier for caregivers. It is now compulsory to wear face coverings in hospitals, on public transport and in places where social distancing is not always possible. This increases the importance of us all finding new ways to communicate with each other, effectively.

This is crucial in health and social care. It is important to be mindful and quick to recognise communication difficulties, while becoming innovative in overcoming them to treat patients effectively.

Most of us find the use of face coverings an extra challenge, some will find it more difficult than others however, especially those who are deaf, have dementia or cognitive impairments, learning disabilities or other conditions such as, COPD, asthma or strokes.

The barrier to communication has been made even more challenging in the health and social care setting as most people are required to attend appointments or seek medical help alone, meaning they cannot have an individual there to provide help and support with communication.

Wearing a face covering can alter the sound and quality of a caregiver’s voice, prevent visual prompts and can make even mild hearing difficulties more apparent. Individuals who are deaf, have slight hearing loss and the elderly can rely upon lip reading to fill in gaps of speech that they miss, this cannot be done whilst a caregiver is wearing a face covering. This means many individuals will be at risk of not understanding basic information or instructions being given to them by caregivers or medical professions. For some, it can cause mental exertion as they try to hear and understand over background noise.

Some people can feel uncomfortable acknowledging they have missed what someone has said and can be embarrassed asking someone to repeat themselves. Being hard of hearing, cognitively impaired or suffering with Dementia can already feel isolating to some people, particularly when now it is harder to understand what those around you are feeling or saying. It can be extremely useful to relay important messages through pictures or written communication in these situations.

Face coverings come with other struggles too. They can make a lot of us feel uncomfortable as our glasses steam and we become hot and bothered. For those that wear behind-the-ear hearing aids, there is a risk of becoming tangled, and the increased risk of losing aids or damage after they have become tangled in the elastics.

All this becomes apparent in an already stressful situation and can in turn make patients feel more anxious or agitated. This is where caregivers can show their understanding and learn new techniques of communication to help resolve and overcome these barriers, helping to eliminate added stressors on their patient.

Unspoken communication has always provided unique opportunities and can be an effective way of connecting with someone. The use of face coverings unfortunately hides people’s feelings of sadness, frustration, pleasure, fear and annoyance – our emotions show on our faces without the need of verbal communication.

People who are living with Dementia or those who are deaf, are often skilled at interpreting facial signals and someone’s feelings so rely on this ability.

It is our responsibility to become more aware of how we come across when people cannot see our facial expressions and when we cannot see theirs. We all must learn to pay greater attention to patients and our own non-verbal cues.

How to communicate effectively:

• Be self-aware – when we are stressed this becomes reflected within our voice, body language and eyes. It is important to think about the information you need to relate and whether you need to use any other additional tools; drawing, writing, visual cues etc. Focus on your patients’ needs and allow enough time to complete interventions without rushing patients or ourselves.

Show respect – use your eyes, eyebrows and smile. Even when a person cannot see your mouth, your smile will be reflected in your eyes. Use your body language positively to create a calm situation and try not to move suddenly.

Speak clearly… but don’t shout – our lives can be noisy environments and background noise can make it difficult for people who are hard of hearing. Pronounce words more clearly and speak loudly enough, but without the use of a raised voice as this can change our tone and shouting can feel patronising to some individuals.

Use friendly body language – as most of our faces are hidden behind face coverings, our body language can be used to show calm and friendliness. This can be comforting if you are having to give difficult, upsetting or sad messages to the patient.

Observation – look carefully, listen to your patients and take note of what they are trying to communicate to you. This can be used to help you communicate more effectively and used to shape your behaviour accordingly.

Embrace technology – you can make use of specialist apps that have been created such as a speech recorder on smartphones which can turn your voice commands into written text.

www.homecaremellor.co.uk

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Thyroid Awareness Month – small but very important.

Our Thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland which is located at the base of our neck. Although this gland is relatively small, the thyroid plays a huge role within our body, influencing the functions of many important organs, including our brain, heart, kidneys, liver and skin.

As our Thyroid plays such a vital role of keeping our bodies healthy, it is important to keep an eye on any changes in our loved ones. Our thyroid can become underactive (Hypothyroidism) or overactive (Hyperthyroidism) so it is important to note the differences in symptoms.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is caused by your thyroid gland underproducing the relevant hormones that your body requires. This is more common within women but doesn’t fully exclude males.

You should contact your GP if your loved one is showing signs of Hypothyroidism. These can include but not limited to:

• Sensitivity to cold.

• Tiredness.

• Muscle aches and weakness.

• Muscle cramps.

• Pain, numbness or tingling sensation in the hands and feet.

• Slow movement and thoughts.

• Brittle hair and nails.

• Dry and scaly skin.

Elderly patients with Hypothyroidism may develop problems with their memory and be at an increased risk of depression. There are also later symptoms of Hypothyroidism that you can look for which can include a hoarse voice, puffy face, slow heart rate, anaemia and hearing loss. People suffering from an underactive thyroid have usually been diagnosed before these symptoms occur.

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is where our thyroid gland produces an excess of hormones into our bodies. This can cause unpleasant symptoms. These can include:

• Difficulty sleeping.

• Weight loss.

• Trembling or twitching.

• Mood swings.

• Nervousness, anxiety or irritability.

• Sensitivity to heat.

• Unusually fast or irregular heartbeat.

• Persistent thirst.

• Needing to urinate more frequently.

Treatment

Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism can be easily treated once diagnosed, so it isn’t something to be majorly concerned about. Although it is always better to seek medical help as soon as symptoms are noticed.

Hyperthyroidism is commonly treated using medicines, radioactive iodine treatment or through surgery. Medicines called Thionamides are commonly used to help stop the overproduction of hormones. These can take a couple of months to help settle so symptoms may not reduce for a period of time.

Radioactive iodine treatment is a type of radiotherapy and is used to destroy the cells in the thyroid gland to help reduce its production of hormones.

Surgery is where your full gland is removed and is usually only done when other treatments have failed, or your thyroid gland is largely swollen. This would require lifelong medication to replace the production of hormones that the thyroid would usually issue.

Hypothyroidism is more commonly treated with the use of daily hormone replacement tablets. These would replace the thyroxine hormone, which the thyroid isn’t producing enough of. Regular blood tests would be necessary until the correct level of hormone has been reached. This requires a little patience as it can take a little while to maintain the correct dose.

Take the Thyroid neck check:

You can easily check your own or loved one’s Thyroid by taking the neck check, using a hand-held mirror and having a glass of water to hand.

With the mirror in your hand, focusing on the lower front area of your neck, above the collarbone, and below the voice box (this is where your Thyroid gland is located.) Whilst focusing on this area, tilt your head backwards, take a drink of water and swallow. As you swallow, look at your neck and check for any protrusions or bulges. (Don’t confuse these with the Adam’s apple.) If you do notice any unusual bulges, consult your GP.

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